Synthesis of Microalgae-derived Microporous Carbons Captured Metal Oxides for Catalytic Conversion of Methane, Natural Gas, or Biogas to Synthesis Gas

Overview of Technology  Alternative solutions to the synthesis of microalgae-derived carbon materials for catalytic conversion to methane, biogas, or syngas Background on Technology Currently, nickel-based catalysts are commercially used for dr…

Overview of Technology
Alternative solutions to the synthesis of microalgae-derived carbon materials for catalytic conversion to methane, biogas, or syngas

Background on Technology
Currently, nickel-based catalysts are commercially used for dry methane reformation due to their low costs compared to noble metals. However, nickel-based catalysts are opting to be deactivated by coke formation resulting from methane decomposition/CO disproportionation as well as sulfur compositions contained in natural/biogas. Therefore it is necessary to search for new functional catalysts, which are carbon-resistant and sulfur-tolerant for catalytic conversion of biogas into synthesis gas (syngas) or biofuels.

Carbon captured metal oxides catalysts are a promising candidate due to their carbon resistant and sulfur-tolerant properties. Porous carbon materials and especially activated carbons continue to be the main choice for the synthesis of the catalyst. In terms of sustainable and economic scalability of the production of activated carbons for catalyst synthesis, biomass rises as a promising candidate owing to its worldwide availability, renewable nature, and low cost.

Microalgae is an additional prospective option. It has very high photosynthesis efficiency and fast growth rate, meaning its harvesting cycle is between 1-10 days, allowing for high turnover than other kinds of biomass which could be used to activate carbon production and guarantee large availability. Microalgae grow in adverse conditions and extreme environments, as well as have enormous biodiversity that allows the synthesis of carbon materials with a wide range of textural and chemical characteristics. Therefore, microalgae-derived carbon materials can be used as a carbon source for the synthesis of microalgae-derived microporous carbons captured metal oxides for catalytic conversion of methane, natural gas, or biogas to syngas or biofuels.

Description of Technology
Nickel, Tungsten, or Molybdenum-based nano-structured catalysts are synthesized by thermal treatment of nickel, tungsten, or molybdenum-impregnated microalgae-derived carbon materials. These nanoparticles exhibit remarkably high activity and stability for catalytic conversion of methane, natural gas, and biogas to syngas or biofuel. CO2 and methane conversion can be improved to over 95% and the activity of catalysts and these nano-structured catalysts show sulfur-tolerant after running with natural or biogas.

This invention provides methods and compositions for nickel, tungsten, or molybdenum-based nano-structured catalysts using techniques to maintain catalyst stability. These are synthesized from micro-algae-derived carbon materials for catalytic conversion of methane, natural gas, or biogas to syngas. Regeneration and recycling of the catalysts are also developed.

Benefits

  • CO2 and methane conversion can be improved to over 95%
  • Maintains catalyst stability
  • Regeneration and recycling of catalysts are developed

Applications
This invention will be applicable to fuel and chemical production-related firms.

Opportunity
This invention is in the proof-of-concept phase and is seeking a licensee.

Website

https://msstate-innovations.technologypublisher.com/technology/46111

Contact Information

TTO Home Page: https://msstate-innovations.technologypublisher.com

Name: Jeremy Clay

Title: Director

Department: Office of Technology Management

Email: jmc17@msstate.edu