Surgical Abdominal Wall Model

OverviewThe Surgical Abdominal Wall (SAW) model is a physical/mechanical model developed by researchers at UMB to simulate laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) and other abdominal wall surgical procedures. Materials were carefully chosen to …

Overview

The Surgical Abdominal Wall (SAW) model is a
physical/mechanical model developed by researchers at UMB to simulate
laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) and other abdominal wall
surgical procedures. Materials were carefully chosen to simulate skin,
tissue, organs, and adhesions associated with abdominal wall morphology
and pathology. Distinguishing characteristics of the model include a
photorealistic peritoneal layer, tissue deformability, and the ability
to use with real clinical instruments, which is an advantage over
virtual reality trainers. The model is particularly well suited for
training surgical professionals to perform LVHR, but may also simulate
adhesiolysis or scope navigation training, for example. Simulation-based
training has gained significant momentum and will be a requirement for
surgical residencies in the near future. In response, the American
College of Surgeons formed a Skills Curriculum Task Force, with the aim
of establishing a National Skills Curriculum. LVHR has been classified
as 1 of 15 procedures on which residents must receive training and some
verification of proficiency. The SAW model has been employed on the UMB
campus over the past 2 years to train over 100 residents in LVHR. The
UMB researchers also demonstrated the SAW model to surgical fellows
during a national conference and found in user surveys that their level
of confidence improved after practicing their procedural skills on the
SAW model.

Applications

Improve surgical outcomes with realistic, cost effective training tool.
Use as part of surgical training and certification curriculum.
Employ for product development to test new surgical tools.

Advantages

Features such as photorealism and tactile feedback important to better simulate surgical environment.
Much more cost effective, portable, and easily sourced than the commonly used pig model.
Has customizable features and many components are durable for extendable use.

Stage of Development

The SAW model has been utilized for
training over 100 residents at UMB and users report improved confidence
in procedural skills.

R&D Required

Further objective validation for use in certifying LVHR skills and manufacturing for widespread use.