Novel Chromogenic Beta-Lactamase Substrate for Diagnostic Biomaterials

Overview

Chromogenic beta-lactamase substrates are used to diagnose bacterial infections. Yet those currently available lose their diagnostic color-change capability when chemically modified. We have synthesized a novel chromogenic beta-lactam molecule (“ANT”) that retains its color-change response when modified for conjugation to a range of polymers.

Market Opportunity

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA are becoming one of the most serious medical threats facing the world. Rapid detection is critical, as many deaths are at least partially due to incorrect antibiotic prescribing and administration. Given that commercially available chromogenic beta-lactamase substrates lose their diagnostic color-change capability when chemically modified, there is a critical need for one that retains this capability.

Innovation and Meaningful Advantages

Beta-lactamases are enzymes produced by many bacteria. Exposure of beta-lactam antibiotics to these enzymes leads to beta-lactam ring cleavage and antibiotic degradation, facilitating antibiotic resistance. We have developed a way to use this cleavage to locally diagnose infection. We have synthesized a new chromogenic beta-lactam molecule (“ANT”) that retains its color-change response when modified for conjugation to a range of polymers. A noteworthy characteristic of ANT is the presence of a primary amine on the beta-lactam ring, as well as a protected carboxylic acid group. This allows the conjugation of other molecules and macromolecules to ANT without loss of its responsiveness to beta-lactamase substrates. The ability to conjugate a broad range of polymers to ANT can enable the development of important diagnostic materials.

Collaboration Opportunity

We are interested in exploring 1) startup opportunities with investors; 2) research collaborations with leading medical research companies; and 3) licensing opportunities with companies.

Principal Investigator

Anita Shukla, PhD
Associate Professor of Engineering
Brown University

anita_shukla@brown.edu

https://vivo.brown.edu/display/ashukla

IP Information

US Utility US20210252010A1, Published August 19, 2021

Publication

Alkekhia D, Safford H, Shukla S, Hopason R, and Shukla A. β-Lactamase triggered visual detection of bacteria using cephalosporin functionalized biomaterials. Chemical Communications. 2020 Aug 04;56:11098-11101. doi.org/10.1039/D0CC04088F.

Contact

Melissa Simon, PhD

Director of Business Development

melissa_j_simon@brown.edu

Brown Tech ID 2569

Website

http://brown.technologypublisher.com/technology/48855

Contact Information

TTO Home Page: http://brown.technologypublisher.com

Name: Melissa Simon

Title: Director of Business Development

Department: BTI

Email: melissa_j_simon@brown.edu