Method for making non-shrinking porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanofiber matrices for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications

Unique material composition comprised of PLGA and cellulose acetate (CA) to produce nanofiber matrices via electrospinningCurrently available electrospun PLGA fiber matrices suffer from mechanical and physical deterioration, thus there is an unmet need…
  • Unique material composition comprised of PLGA and cellulose acetate (CA) to produce nanofiber matrices via electrospinning
  • Currently available electrospun PLGA fiber matrices suffer from mechanical and physical deterioration, thus there is an unmet need to design matrices for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications that provide optimized physicochemical properties
  • This technology is a unique material composition comprised of PLGA and cellulose acetate (CA) to produce nanofiber matrices via electrospinning that overcome current structural limitations

Background and Unmet Need

Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) is currently in use in a number of FDA-approved medical devices for orthopedic and drug delivery applications. Unfortunately, electrospun PLGA fiber matrices suffer from mechanical and physical deterioration following short incubation times in simulated physiological environments. For instance, neat PLGA nanofiber matrices shrink in size significantly once exposed to aqueous media or bodily fluids and become brittle due to rapid polymer degradation within a very short period of time. In addition, individual fibers fail to retain their morphology and structure which is not desirable for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. There is an unmet need to design matrices for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications that provide optimized physicochemical properties in terms of morphology, degradation, and mechanical properties for predictable performance.

Technology

UConn researchers have developed a unique material composition comprised of PLGA and CA to produce nanofiber matrices via electrospinning that overcome the limitations associated with the current PLGA electrospun nanofiber matrices.

Advantages

PLGA-CA novel compositions retain much desired physicochemical properties such as morphology, degradation, and mechanical properties
Cellular compatibility studies indicate the better cell survival and spreading behavior that was correlated with matrix hydrophilicity and scaffold malleability
PLGA-CA-based nanofiber matrices show improved initial cell attachment, survival, and proliferation in comparison to PLGA alone

Website

https://uconn.flintbox.com/technologies/021AC76C43DA458AA191FB5551C7F21E

Potential Applications:

  • Method for making non-shrinking porous PLGA nanofiber matrices for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications
  • Matrix can be used as a patch to cover superficial wounds or internal soft tissue injuries to deliver drugs to the site of injury and promote tissue healing
  • Has both animal and human applications

Contact Information:

  • Name: Christopher Conners
  • Title :
  • Department :
  • Email : christopher.conners@uconn.edu
  • Phone : 860-679-8772
  • Address :