Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Optical Probe Design for Quantifying Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygenation – IR 2614

  • An innovative fiber-optic probe with long tips for use with hair on occipital lobe

Background

Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses fiber-optic probes to measure blood flow in cerebral tissue. However, most DCS studies place fiber-optic probes on frontal heads to avoid hair because hair could easily block light detected by this single-mode fiber probe. As a result, current DCS probes can only be used to measure cerebral blood flow from non-hairy areas making it difficult to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation from different areas of the brain.

Technology Overview

Developed at the University of Kentucky, this technology overcomes hair influence by using an innovative fiber-optic probe with long tips that can be used with hair on the occipital lobe. The innovation allows optical fibers to move around more freely on the occipital lobe and avoid hair blockage. The fiber tip diameter was increased from 2.5 to 5 mm to expand the surface area and reduce pressure from the fiber tip on the skin. Two Velcro taps were also integrated into the probe for fixing the probe on the head. Beside the DCS fiber, the new design allows for the possible integration of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) fibers for oxygenation measurements. Instead of using another imaging modality like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or transcranial Doppler ultrasound (limited to the cranial window) to measure cerebral blood flow, this invention makes the DCS a low-cost technique to measure cerebral blood flow from different brain areas.

Website

https://uky.flintbox.com/technologies/1B40F7DD51534CDCB4F3FE85027D9E61

Advantages

  • Measures cerebral blood flow from different brain areas
  • Reduces pressure from the fiber tip on the skin
  • Non-invasive
  • Low-cost

Contact Information

Name: Marketing Contact

Email: techinquiries@uky.edu

Phone: (859) 257-2149