Antibacterial Janus Nanoparticles

• Antimicrobial resistance is a major global healthcare burden that accounts for more than 2.8 million infections in the US alone.• A novel Janus nanoparticle that is 10-30 times more effective at killing bacteria at lower concentrations.• The me…

• Antimicrobial resistance is a major global healthcare burden that accounts for more than 2.8 million infections in the US alone.
• A novel Janus nanoparticle that is 10-30 times more effective at killing bacteria at lower concentrations.
• The mechanism of action kills bacteria and prevents resistance development.

Abstract:

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major global healthcare burden that accounts for more than 2.8 million infections and 35,000 deaths in the US alone. The rate of AMR evolution is outpacing the development of new antibiotics. Researchers are increasingly looking at nanomaterials as candidates to treat bacteria-related disease. A novel Janus nanoparticle has been created that is 10-30 times more effective at killing bacteria, at lower concentrations, than traditional antimicrobial nanoparticles. Traditional antimicrobial nanoparticles have uniform coatings, this novel Janus nanoparticle has two different surfaces. One side is coated with a hydrophobic alkyl chain and the opposite side is coated with a cationic ligand. The two different surfaces allow for the hydrophobic side to disrupt the bacterial cell envelope while the cationic side induces a reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill the bacteria. Because of the mechanism ofs physical disruption of the bacteria cell envelope, bacterial resistance is unlikely to develop. The Janus nanoparticle has shown to be effective against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

Website:

https://iu.flintbox.com/technologies/BA0B1A208B6D44DBB8A60561DFF2642D

Advantages:

There is an urgent global need for the development of new antibiotics. This novel, two-faced Janus particle achieves a 10-30 times more effective killing, at lower concentrations, of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria versus uniformly coated nanoparticles, while also limiting the risk of resistance development. The primary target applications for this technology will be for implantable medical devices and antiseptic wound dressings. Research is ongoing to determine further applications.

Potential Applications:

Antimicrobial Coatings

Contact Information:

Name : Tyson Rugenstein

Email: trugenst@iu.edu

Phone: 317-278-1916