Adenosine Gel to Treat Inflammation

­ Application Hydrogel to treat inflammation after cardiac injury, pericarditis, myocardial infarction, and myocarditis. Key Benefits Minimally invasive. Increases levels of adenosine in target tissues. Can be applied to other organs such a…

Application
Hydrogel to treat inflammation after cardiac injury, pericarditis, myocardial infarction, and myocarditis.

Key Benefits

  • Minimally invasive.
  • Increases levels of adenosine in target tissues.
  • Can be applied to other organs such as the liver and kidneys.
  • Could be used to promote hair and nail growth.


Market Summary
Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) trap, neutralize, and kill bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites and are thought to prevent bacterial and fungal dissemination. Researchers at Emory University have concluded that NETs negatively impact cardiac function and immune infiltration. They have also successfully prototyped an adenosine delivery polyethylene (PEG) hydrogel as a NET antagonist to treat inflammation. This technology can be used to treat patients with heart disease. 647,000 Americans die from heart disease every year. The U.S. is the largest market for heart disease and is expected to reach $26.7 billion in sales by 2028 (IQVIA Forecast: Disease).

Technical Summary
In conjunction with researchers at Georgia Tech, researchers at Emory have developed a gel that continually produces adenosine. The hydrogel has embedded ectonucleotidases (CD73 and CD39) that catalyze the conversion of ATP, ADP, and AMP into Adenosine. Adenosine It is beneficial in the heart as it promotes vasodilation, inhibits platelets, and reduces inflammation by acting on adenosine receptors in many cell types. Adenosine also inhibits the NET formation and may be an important endogenous regulator.

Developmental Stage
Prototype tested.

Contact Information

TTO Home Page: https://emoryott.technologypublisher.com

Name: David Mudd

Title: Licensing Associate

Email: dmudd@emory.edu